“The House with Nobody in It”

When we moved from our first home, I made an album for the new owners of the building process and some of the things our little house had seen. I wanted them to know that it was a house full of love–a happy house. And I found this poem to go into the album. The house I photographed on Sunday brought it to mind again.

The House with Nobody in It

Whenever I walk to Suffern along the Erie track
I go by a poor old farmhouse with its shingles broken and black.
I suppose I’ve passed it a hundred times, but I always stop for a minute
And look at the house, the tragic house, the house with nobody in it.

I never have seen a haunted house, but I hear there are such things;
That they hold the talk of spirits, their mirth and sorrowings.
I know this house isn’t haunted, and I wish it were, I do;
For it wouldn’t be so lonely if it had a ghost or two.

This house on the road to Suffern needs a dozen panes of glass,
And somebody ought to weed the walk and take a scythe to the grass.
It needs new paint and shingles, and the vines should be trimmed and tied;
But what it needs the most of all is some people living inside.

If I had a lot of money and all my debts were paid
I’d put a gang of men to work with brush and saw and spade.
I’d buy that place and fix it up the way it used to be
And I’d find some people who wanted a home and give it to them free.

Now, a new house standing empty, with staring window and door,
Looks idle, perhaps, and foolish, like a hat on its block in the store.
But there’s nothing mournful about it; it cannot be sad and lone
For the lack of something within it that it has never known.

But a house that has done what a house should do,
a house that has sheltered life,
That has put its loving wooden arms around a man and his wife,
A house that has echoed a baby’s laugh and held up his stumbling feet,
Is the saddest sight, when it’s left alone, that ever your eyes could meet.

So whenever I go to Suffern along the Erie track
I never go by the empty house without stopping and looking back,
Yet it hurts me to look at the crumbling roof and the shutters fallen apart,
For I can’t help thinking the poor old house is a house with a broken heart.

Joyce Kilmer

What I saw THIS Sunday

Which, by the time you read this, will be yesterday. (And, Sarah, the car was either STOPPED at a red light or PARKED while taking all of these photos.) Last Sunday was sunny and in Texas. . .this Sunday was cloudy and spanned two states. I’m a gypsy, I tell ya!

I ACTUALLY saw this at about 6:15 on Friday evening.

A barn on the Perryville road. I would like to move that oak, and I was too well brought up to scale the fence and trespass to get a better shot.

Plus, this stallion was in the paddock, and though I am not traditionally scared of horse, I think he might have been cussing me out. He was, at the very least, snorting. His mare was nearby.

This does not even do it justice. I will try again this summer. . .it's a lovely curve.

Directives AND Directions from the Louisiana Highways Department

And all of that information is at the border of Morehouse. . .

. . .and Ouachita Parishes. (That is "Wash-ih-taw" –short i in "ih"–for those of you that live in counties.)”

This is BARELY over the border into Texas. I coveted.

Overlooking the gorgeous wisteria, I do believe this house has a story.

Wish I knew what it was.

This particular visit was like good medicine. . .and I missed the kids being with me, but it was nice to have Momma all to myself!!!

It’s a Good Day: New and Improved. Well. At least improved

Last Friday before I set out for school (and I was VERY late, mind you), I posted this. . .post. But my pictures were all CRAMMED together and I didn’t even realize it until I showed it to Momma on Friday night.

It is fixed now. And I had a GREAT time with my Momma!!!!! And also my sister and my brother–hey Brother–hey Sister. 🙂
——————————————————————
I am going to see my Momma. I am getting into my car at 1:30 and driving to Louisiana, and I am happy, happy, happy.

Go and read THIS blog. From Sarah. Excellent writing and wonderful sentiment. HILARIOUSLY funny and oh, so true.

And THIS is what I saw last weekend on my Sunday drive. 🙂

And, a song. . .the video is not the point. The song is. (Sarah–turn it up. 🙂

A picture and a prayer

I went for a drive yesterday. It was VERY nice–perfect sky–perfect light. I have photos. Alas, I have no time. But here is one–errr. . .2.

Yes, they are REALLY this color. . .and they smell DIVINE.

I put these particular ones here in honor of sweet Cassidi in my 7th period class. She has had two unexplained seizures in the past couple of months, the second and most serious today shortly after she left my reading class to go home. She is in Texas Childrens Hospital awaiting some more tests. Her mom is a teacher in the district, and Cassidi has an identical twin, Carli. She is such a sweet, lovely JOY to have that before spring break when the kids were WY-ULD, I moved her and another sweetie (Mica) up to the front of the room where I normally put the “bad kids” so I could look at SWEET kids for a change. It brightens the room. I highly recommend it.

Anyway–pray for Cassidi. And enjoy the photo of the pretty, FUCHSIA flowers.

Create or Die

I have told you of my quirks before. . .remember the whole even vs. odd number thing???? So–this is not a quirk–this is a NECESSITY. Sometimes I have to do something creative. . .something pretty. . .something whimsical or I feel like I will shrivel up and die. Literally. Either that or really injure someone.

So. Today was one of those days as writing about library trends (though helping me to attain my masters) is not what I consider “creative.” Or pretty. After school, I betook myself to Hobby Lobby and there I found (DRUM ROLL PLEASE). . .

INSPIRATION for the Mother & Daughter Luncheon. If you are in the habit of being invited, you are invited again this year. We are decorating with blue and white (pink flowers) in an Anthropologie eclectic style, using my blue and white dishes and gee-gaws, borrowing a lovely cloth pennant banner from my friend Daphne, even kicking around the possibility of having it in the clearing.

ANYWAY. I found THESE PLATES on the CLEARANCE aisle. I love these plates. I love that they were on CLEARANCE. I love that they have birds on them. And Robin’s egg blue eggs. And SCRIPTURE. And MOST of all I love that when I described them to Victoria over the phone (since she is now old enough to have SEVERAL OPINIONS), her exact words–SIGHT UNSEEN–were, “Oh, Mommy!!! I LOVE THEM ALREADY!!!!”

I will pair them with some blue and white napkins I found at IKEA several years ago–like five or more–and look it. CUTENESS. (We also have some blue and white bandana napkins from Target last year that will work their way in as well.)

We have chosen the font and the quote for the invitation. See?

Who knew Robin Williams would say ANYTHING appropriate to put on a girly luncheon invitation? Will wonders never cease?

THEN–in the midst of finding out that one of my professors had given me a zero for an assignment I turned in. . .and having to take it up with her via e-mail. . .and folding laundry. . .and sniffing VEHEMENTLY with my fourth cold of the school year???? I thought of a cupcake decor idea!!!! Oh yes, indeedy, I did. And I told Victoria–and she bounced around–but THAT will be a surprise for later.

This is what I LOVE doing. . .this makes me HAPPY. This does not CAUSE stress–it ALLEVIATES stress. Stress is caused by all of the OTHER things I have to do–like work on something other than lovely, creative things. (Click on photos to see BIG.)

Oh. . .the Busy

There is lots of that. Here is a photo to let you know I am alive.

Geraniums

Victoria's Tulips o' Victory

What I’m writing instead of blog posts. . .tonight’s Graduate Assignment. . .

Identify one trend in the field of library and information science that you would like to further explore:
An evolving profession: The collision of library versus information pardigms, Rubin, Chapter 3

Explain in a paragraph what you think this trend is about.
As the speed at which information is sent/received and the volume of information in our current age grows and expands to become not only societal but global, libraries and librarians must evolve to meet future challenges while holding fast to certain tenants of librarianship as a whole. I believe the trend focuses on how libraries and librarians are viewed in a certain concrete or stagnant role rather than how they are–and historically have been–flexible to the ever-changing needs of patrons and the communities in which they are located or work. Because of the rigid view held by many regarding the role of libraries, some would throw the proverbial baby out with the bathwater and “reinvent” the purpose, goal, and mission of libraries and librarianship rather than dove-tail the traditional goals with the ever-changing boom of information-related technology and acquisition.

Explain in a paragraph how the chosen trend is relevant you personally.
I have long waited for the opportunity to reach my goal of becoming a librarian. My dream of pursuing a masters of library science began twenty years ago this August. Over the past twenty years the information and technology booms have changed how libraries look, feel, and are run. Despite the fact that we are more than a decade into a technology boom, we are still only at the beginning. During my twenty years as a classroom teacher, I have seen the pendulum of education practices and theory swing from one extreme to the other, and back again. My belief has always been that good teachers stand in the middle. We aren’t fence-sitters. We are just wise enough to use best practices from both extremes and everything in between. I feel that good librarians must do the same. We must hold to the best practices of the past while integrating current practices and future ones to come.

That took a GOOD portion of my night. . .then I had to come up with questions. . .then I had to find three “scholarly articles” to read at a later date and cite them in the correct stylistic format. . .and my professor happens to be head of the department. Kind of like Mary Poppins for librarians–except without the singing.